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Podcast: HomeKit and Home Assistant embrace Matter – Stacey on IoT

Podcast: HomeKit and Home Assistant embrace Matter – Stacey on IoT

Podcast: HomeKit and Home Assistant embrace Matter - Stacey on IoT

I think it’s a little more like:

“Why should I use the electricity from the account I pay to leave my porch lights on all night only if one of my neighbors comes home late and thinks the spilled light is useful when entering their own home?”

Most applications are not emergencies. And there are reasons, environmental and otherwise, to choose not to use electricity – or WiFi – “just in case.”

LoRa has, by definition, low power, but WiFi is certainly not, at least as it is currently implemented.

And just as porch lights cause light pollution, more WiFi traffic can cause different types of problems.

Sure, it’s probably not a big deal: but “it’s not a big deal” doesn’t mean best engineering practices either. Or necessarily the best for the long-term health of the community.

I’m sure that if someone’s mother was missing, most of the community would be happy to help. But this will not be the case with most sidewalk use. And there are arguments of “good neighbor” not to leave the porch lights on all night, especially the conservation of resources.

As long as we live in a culture that allows for individual control (and individual billing!) Of these resources, it seems a little unfair to shame someone for not signing up to share them. Street lighting is a community resource, paid for from a community budget. The porch lights – and WiFi in many places – are not.

If the sidewalk is an essential community, it should be paid for with a common budget and regulated for the good of the community. If not, giving up is an individual choice, regardless of one’s reasons.

Filed with respect.