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Podcast: McKinsey reevaluates the impact of IoT – Stacey on IoT

Podcast: McKinsey reevaluates the impact of IoT – Stacey on IoT

This week’s show has a lot of big numbers, starting at $ 12.6 trillion, which is at the top of what McKinsey believes the economic impact of the IoT will be by 2030. We cover the most recent report, which is a reassessment of McKinsey’s famous 2015 IoT report that said it would be worth $ 11 trillion by 2015. That didn’t turn out too well. We also discuss Qualcomm’s plans for the IoT business to generate $ 9 billion in revenue by 2024. Also in terms of chips, we cover additional delays in the ARM-Nvidia deal before discussing a strange patent Apple and Apple lose head of home services. Amazon also has news with new, cheap smart light switches for up to $ 17.99 and an update for the latest Echo and Echo Dots speakers that allow them to detect occupancy using ultrasound. Then we talk about a scam for Nanoleaf lights available from Yeelight, a Xiaomi company, and Kevin shares his thoughts on a useful app for HomeKit users, for which it’s worth paying. Finally, we end by answering a listener question about how to find a HomeKit compatible method of connecting light strips to a sensor.

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Yeelight panels are after the original Nanoleaf panels, but cost half the price at $ 97.99. Image courtesy of Yeelight.

Our guest this week is Jen Caltrider, the leader on Mozilla’s list of non-inclusive privacy of creepy and not-so-creepy connected devices and applications. This year’s list has been the largest so far, with 147 services and devices, and I was actually surprised at how much improvement has been made in some of the security and data practices. Caltrider shares the methodology, especially the flagrant devices, and where we seem to be heading on the front of security and privacy. We also receive tips for consumers who still want to buy these gadgets and recommendations for the companies that produce them. I was thrilled to see that the list was forced by someone who loves gadgets as much as I do, but who is still concerned about the impact that poorly secured products or lackluster data policies have on trust.